Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

wheat grinder question


  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 christmasvalleyfarms

christmasvalleyfarms

    Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • PipPipPip
  • 76 posts

Posted 01 October 2008 - 08:23 AM

After 20 years my stone grinder finally bit the bullet. I think my main reason for getting the stone one at the time was it enabled me to select the degree of fineness; could also do cracked wheat. So now I"m back on the market but wonder if anyone who's had experience with different kinds of wheat grinders could offer their advice as to what type they prefer and why? Thanks!:)

#2 Wingnut

Wingnut

    A little nutty, with wings

  • Members
  • 10410 posts
  • LocationCleveland, OH

Posted 01 October 2008 - 07:50 PM

This is the kind I have: K-Tec / BlendTec Kitchen Mill™ Wheat Grinder

My MIL gave it to us for our wedding...she's got the same kind as has used it for years. I know several people who have this one, including my ward Relief Society.
Now the trouble about trying to make yourself stupider than you really are is that you very often succeed. -- C.S. Lewis

If we're going to be stupid about this, we're going to be stupid on my terms. -- my husband

#3 wy0mn

wy0mn

    Junior Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • PipPip
  • 21 posts

Posted 10 October 2008 - 07:54 PM

Its worth a little extra to get quality. Trust me, I know. I tried to cut corners with a Chinese made, cast iron monstrosity that reeked of 10W40. Never again.
Havamal 74: Nótt verðr feginnsá er nesti trúir... He welcomes the night who has enough provisions...

#4 NateHowe

NateHowe

    Senior Member

  • Inactive 2+ Years
  • 395 posts

Posted 16 October 2008 - 09:57 PM

A lot of it depends on your use model. If you plan to do small amounts, perhaps for a loaf or two of bread per week and a bit of cracked wheat cereal, then a hand-cranked grinder might be your most economical option. But if you are doing much more than that, an electric one is probably more practical. If you hesitate to get another electric grinder because of possible power outages, you might consider that you will not likely be baking bread with the power out, anyway. It's pretty hard to bake when utilities are out. There are other things to do with the wheat besides making bread in an emergency situation.

Hear my music and download the sheet music for free at NathanHoweMusic.com.
NEW: Come and Behold Him, a Christmas Cantata


#5 valereee

valereee

    Junior Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 18 October 2008 - 02:22 AM

After 20 years my stone grinder finally bit the bullet.


20 years is pretty good! What brand did you have?

#6 valereee

valereee

    Junior Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 18 October 2008 - 02:27 AM

A lot of it depends on your use model. If you plan to do small amounts, perhaps for a loaf or two of bread per week and a bit of cracked wheat cereal, then a hand-cranked grinder might be your most economical option. But if you are doing much more than that, an electric one is probably more practical. If you hesitate to get another electric grinder because of possible power outages, you might consider that you will not likely be baking bread with the power out, anyway. It's pretty hard to bake when utilities are out. There are other things to do with the wheat besides making bread in an emergency situation.


But there are also other things to do with wheat flour when the power is out, too -- you can make flatbreads on any cooking surface.

My husband is giving me a grinder for my birthday, and I'm trying to decide what I want. I want to be able to use it without power, and I'd like it to be versatile enough to do various grinds. I also want it to be fixable, so the fewer parts the better. I'd love any suggestions!

Val

#7 skalenfehl

skalenfehl

    My Own Worst Enemy

  • Members
  • 3954 posts

Posted 18 October 2008 - 10:00 AM

When I was a kid, my dad bought two hand cranking grinders. One for coarser cracked wheat for cereal and one for finer ground flour for baking bread. I decided to check ebay and finally bought one for myself just now.

NEW BIG HOPPER CAST IRON CORN GRINDER WHEAT GRAIN NUT - eBay (item 160292043379 end time Oct-18-08 09:39:51 PDT)

#8 Elgama

Elgama

    Senior Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • 3150 posts

Posted 18 October 2008 - 10:34 AM

A lot of it depends on your use model. If you plan to do small amounts, perhaps for a loaf or two of bread per week and a bit of cracked wheat cereal, then a hand-cranked grinder might be your most economical option. But if you are doing much more than that, an electric one is probably more practical. If you hesitate to get another electric grinder because of possible power outages, you might consider that you will not likely be baking bread with the power out, anyway. It's pretty hard to bake when utilities are out. There are other things to do with the wheat besides making bread in an emergency situation.


in an emergency situation 2 rocks will grind wheat and its possible to bake bread

-Charley

#9 NateHowe

NateHowe

    Senior Member

  • Inactive 2+ Years
  • 395 posts

Posted 18 October 2008 - 11:23 AM

Unless it's a long-term cataclysmic event, I doubt many of us will say, "OOH! The power's out! Time to grind some wheat!"

Hear my music and download the sheet music for free at NathanHoweMusic.com.
NEW: Come and Behold Him, a Christmas Cantata


#10 The_Seeker

The_Seeker

    Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • PipPipPip
  • 47 posts

Posted 18 October 2008 - 08:40 PM

When I was a kid, my dad bought two hand cranking grinders. One for coarser cracked wheat for cereal and one for finer ground flour for baking bread. I decided to check ebay and finally bought one for myself just now.

NEW BIG HOPPER CAST IRON CORN GRINDER WHEAT GRAIN NUT - eBay (item 160292043379 end time Oct-18-08 09:39:51 PDT)

Would you mind posting your thoughts on that when you get it?

#11 skalenfehl

skalenfehl

    My Own Worst Enemy

  • Members
  • 3954 posts

Posted 19 October 2008 - 08:37 AM

Would you mind posting your thoughts on that when you get it?


Sure thing. I'll post pictures and give a review when I've ground up some wheat. I'm already familiar with this old style grinder as this is what I grew up with. I remember well the countless revolutions on the crank as my dad cheered me on to see how fast I could empty the hopper, lol. The grinders that my father had were bought second hand at a garage/yard sale/flea market and I remember well eating tons of cracked wheat cereal growing up and lots of delicious fresh baked bread compliments of my mother. Oh man, I'm drooling now. :P

#12 yeti_mawl

yeti_mawl

    Junior Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 13 November 2008 - 11:46 AM

I enjoy my Country Living Grain Mill. I don't see much use in having an electric mill unless I was using it daily for baking. My guess is most people are going to use one off and on and that it is going to see a lot of time on the shelf waiting for harder times. When those harder time come they will be glad they got a good one they could depend on.

Just my $.02.

#13 Yukon_Mike

Yukon_Mike

    Junior Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts

Posted 22 November 2008 - 05:32 PM

I purchased the Family Grain Mill with the Hand Base and with the optional adapter for use on my Kitchen Aid stand mixer for motorized operation. This combination allows milling with or without electricity. This mill mills coffee, wheat, rice, corn (not popcorn), oats, rye, barley, spelt, flax, buckwheat, millet, sesame and more it also cracks grain like Barley if you want to home brew beer. There are just six parts to this grinder, very easy to disassemble for cleaning and built for durability with very high quality. This is a burr grinder, the burrs are made of hardened stainless steel and fully adjustable including index markings for repeatable settings reference from coarse to fine grinding. Yes, it is mainly plastic but the plastic is Lexan (polycarbonate) the same plastic used in bullet-proof windows. The mill is versatile because of its modular design that lets you add a Vegetable Processor that slices and shreds vegetables, fruits, cheeses etc., a Flaker Mill for making oat meal, a Meat Grinder and Sausage Stuffer.

This is a very efficient machine, my milling produces three (3) cups of flour in four minutes of hand cranking at two (2) Revolutions Per Second cranking speed (single milling) with almost no effort to turn the crank. I use the Kitchen Aid mixer adapter when I mill and maintain the 2 RPS speed. At this cranking speed the milled flour only reaches 93 degrees from kernels that are 76 degrees to start with so there is no heat degradation to the flour milled. The hopper is large and it can hold up to five cups of whole wheat kernels. The laminated wood hand crank base clamps to a table top very securely without marring the table. The hand crank is very easy to turn and is easy to continuously crank at about two revolutions per second.

For those who want to get into grain milling with a lower cost but good quality, fast and versatile machine this is it. The mill comes with a life time warranty, what more could you want? My Family Grain Mill was $130.00 including the Kitchen Aid mixer adapter for motorized operation. Not a bad price when you consider it is two machines in one; I have a hand crank miller or a powered miller when there’s electricity. In just 8 minutes you can mill enough flour (6 cups) for two loaves of bread.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image
"Fail to Plan --- Plan to Fail"

#14 christmasvalleyfarms

christmasvalleyfarms

    Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • PipPipPip
  • 76 posts

Posted 23 November 2008 - 12:43 AM

20 years is pretty good! What brand did you have?

Geez I just now saw your question! I don't always get notified when posts come in on a thread, obviously...? Oh well. It was a mill-rite which I got from Retsel. It was great while it lasted! Thanks to all for all the info -

#15 BenRaines

BenRaines

    Senior Member

  • Inactive 6+ Months
  • 5505 posts

Posted 23 November 2008 - 08:54 AM

Yukon_Mike, that looks like the perfect setup. We already have the Kitchen Aide mixer. I will need to look for one online. Ben Raines
"If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties." Sir Francis Bacon

#16 chitchat

chitchat

    Senior Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • 105 posts

Posted 02 December 2008 - 06:26 PM

I've heard very good things about the Country Living grinder. Those photos of the Kitchenaid Mixer attachment are interesting. I didn't know I could get one with that. That's really kewl. I got a grinder to attach to my Champion juicer, but I haven't had a chance to use it yet. I'll try to let you know if it works well.

#17 donavistaboy

donavistaboy

    Junior Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 04 December 2008 - 07:00 AM

I have a meat grinder attachment for my Oster Kitchen Center, and for my KitchenAid Stand mixer. (OK, I'm a gadget nut...) Will my meat grinder work as a grain mill? Thanks for the help.

#18 Yukon_Mike

Yukon_Mike

    Junior Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts

Posted 04 December 2008 - 02:14 PM

Sorry to say, but no it will not work on grain. The meat grinder uses a chopper blade and that is not meant for fine milling of grain.
"Fail to Plan --- Plan to Fail"

#19 Karl

Karl

    Junior Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 07 May 2010 - 08:31 AM

Why don't you take a look at Wheat Grinder which I must recommend for you.I'm using it now which is cheap and working fine.

#20 MisterT

MisterT

    Banned

  • Banned
  • 373 posts

Posted 07 May 2010 - 08:34 AM

I used my Grandmother until she wore out; now I just buy flour :(
"I pity the foo who doesn't listen to MrT." - Hordak

"There comes a time when diplomacy fails, when all discussion is fruitless. You will then face me under a different and final circumstance." - Col. Michael "Mad Mike" Hoare

"God is on the side with the best artillery." Napoleon Bonaparte




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

IPB Skin By Virteq