Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Brick/Block Wood Burning Grill/Oven


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 at2wooden

at2wooden

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts

Posted 22 November 2009 - 02:04 PM

This is my first post here.
I know you'll have some thoughts on this to share.
I well am on my way to family food storage, and one thing that concerns me is how I will cook if I lose my utilities for a longer than usual time.
I live in S.Florida and already use a Coleman propane grill for short term emergencies like our annual hurricane seasons.
Since I live near a park that I could probably scrounge up firewood if I need it, and would like to build a wood burning grill that could also have an oven out of concrete block or brick.
Has anyone done this?
Anyone know of a download-able set of plans?
Does this make sense to anyone else?

Also, where would I get the kind of grate I would need for something like this? Have one made out of re-bar?

Edited by at2wooden, 22 November 2009 - 02:14 PM.


#2 at2wooden

at2wooden

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts

Posted 22 November 2009 - 04:21 PM

anyone seen these Justa Stoves?
http://www.green-tru...astoveplans.pdf

#3 BenRaines

BenRaines

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 5505 posts

Posted 22 November 2009 - 04:28 PM

I have propane for use. Two five gallon tanks that I keep full and over 40 of the small quart size cans to use. The key to emergency preparedness planning is to minimize the use. To use wood or other combustible materials it would require a lot and there would be significant waste. Think how much wood you have to burn to get a fire to boil and then you waste the coals, which are the best part. quick on and quick off with propane.

Ben Raines
"If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties." Sir Francis Bacon

#4 at2wooden

at2wooden

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts

Posted 22 November 2009 - 06:07 PM

Thanks for your quick reply!
Yes, I have a couple of 5 gallon tanks for my BBQ and keep about 10 quarts for the the emergency Coleman. But, having more propane inside the house (no garage, no shed) makes me nervous.
I guess what I'm looking for is a long term alternative.

#5 BenRaines

BenRaines

    Senior Member

  • Registered Users
  • 5505 posts

Posted 22 November 2009 - 07:49 PM

Store the propane in rubbermaid containers and keep them outside. The 5 gallon ones store outside well too.

I would never store them in the house. The only time you would have to worry about them is if the house is on fire. If the house is on fire should be out of it and gone anyway. Risk for the firemen. So is ammo in the house.

Ben Raines
"If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties." Sir Francis Bacon

#6 at2wooden

at2wooden

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts

Posted 22 November 2009 - 10:33 PM

Good to know. Thanks.
Glad I'm not a fireman these days.

#7 California_Dreaming

California_Dreaming

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 52 posts

Posted 25 November 2009 - 04:05 PM

...Two five gallon tanks that I keep full and over 40 of the small quart size cans to use. ...

Ben Raines


Ben, how long do you think that is supply would last?

#8 at2wooden

at2wooden

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts

Posted 25 November 2009 - 04:59 PM

I'm going to get one of these Wood / Charcoal Rocket Stoves as a back up.
If this thing is as good as it looks, maybe I'll build the stove/oven in the backyard.

StoveTec Rocket Stove - Save an additional 5% with the Promo Code

Rocket stove - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

or here's a link to make one yourself for a few dollars

how to make a rocket stove

And here's a link to show you how to make one using 16 ordinary bricks in your existing fireplace.

YouTube - Adventures in eco living #01 ... Brick rocket stove version 1

Edited by at2wooden, 28 November 2009 - 05:14 PM.
new info


#9 Michael68

Michael68

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts

Posted 29 November 2009 - 06:47 PM

Interesting. Just a few weeks ago I met a guy who has a concrete-dome-cooker that stands about 6 feet tall at its tallest spot. We spent about a 1/2 hour looking it over and asking questions. He brings it up to 800 degrees and cooks pizzas in it, in 90 seconds! I think, not sure, that it takes an hour and a half or two to get it up to temperature though, which makes it inefficient for a small family. He is in the process of looking at making flat breads commercially with this. Once again going from a bad memory, I believe that he can bake 4, 18x18 pieces of flat bread every 75 seconds once he gets to temperature. If you are interested, I will contact him to see where he found his plans.

#10 at2wooden

at2wooden

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts

Posted 29 November 2009 - 07:24 PM

Thanks...I'd be glad to look them over

#11 durangout

durangout

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 12 September 2010 - 04:38 PM

I have just completed building what you asked about in your post. How I came to the conclusion to build this was something like this: As I thought about food storage more and more, I realized that the most common food that can be made from "the basics" was bread. There is only 1 way to make real bread and that is in an oven and there will be no electric ovens during TEOTWAWKI. I researched many different ways and considered various options. I also consider the fuel needed. during one of my internet searches I came across the wood fired brick oven and realized that was my answer for a couple of reasons.

To make along story short, I am super happy with my decison to build it. I have made the most incrdible pizzas with it as well as roast chicken--really better than any restaurant you've ever had. there is somthing about the way it cooks that there is nothing really like it. I'm going to start experimenting with bread next.

Anyway, I figure that in the case of TEOTWAWKI, I have a profession: village baker. If nothing happens, I will be able to enjoy great entertaining and unique meals.

Please let me konw what other quesitons you have but the web site I got my plans from was fornobrovo.com. I suggest you spending some time on that site regardless. If you are considering it, I would say you will be 110% happy with it. I know I am.

Edited by durangout, 15 September 2010 - 08:05 PM.


#12 durangout

durangout

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 12 September 2010 - 04:42 PM

anyone seen these Justa Stoves?
http://www.green-tru...astoveplans.pdf


Yes. I've built somthing like it from a 5 gal paint can. The "rocket stoves" work quite well and are very efficient with wood. In the experiments I did with the one I built, 2 lbs of wood gave off flame for about 40 mins. The coals of course lasted much longer.

Edited by durangout, 15 September 2010 - 08:06 PM.


#13 WyomingEMT

WyomingEMT

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 114 posts

Posted 12 September 2010 - 05:21 PM

I agree with everyone concerning propane. It's easy to store, and it won't go bad. You can buy a heating unit that you can cook on. You can also use propane indoors (in an emergency with good ventilation). Don't hold my feet to the fire concerning indoor use, I did said emergency and ventilation.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

IPB Skin By Virteq