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Is it ok to write your prayer?


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#1 InquisitiveSoul

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 11:34 AM

I find myself in a position where it's difficult to find sufficient time to kneel and say all the things I want to say during a prayer (mostly due to work schedules - I often fall asleep at night while praying!). I do have down time at one of my jobs each day where I spend some time writing between clients and I thought why not take some of that time to write a prayer letter? I would take a knee and pray during this time, but I'm in a office setting and a letter may also help me organize my thoughts better. I don't know that there is any doctrine either way on this, but what are your thoughts? Is this simply silly or is it ok? One of the benefits is later on I'd have a record of my prayer to look back on. Any thoughts?

#2 Dominic_Korozya

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 11:38 AM

I find myself in a position where it's difficult to find sufficient time to kneel and say all the things I want to say during a prayer (mostly due to work schedules - I often fall asleep at night while praying!). I do have down time at one of my jobs each day where I spend some time writing between clients and I thought why not take some of that time to write a prayer letter? I would take a knee and pray during this time, but I'm in a office setting and a letter may also help me organize my thoughts better.

I don't know that there is any doctrine either way on this, but what are your thoughts? Is this simply silly or is it ok? One of the benefits is later on I'd have a record of my prayer to look back on.

Any thoughts?


I know some mormons who record their prayers in a prayer book that is kept like a diary.

Moroni Chapter 8 verse 16
"I fear not what man can do; for perfect love casteth out all fear"


#3 Maureen

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 11:43 AM

No! But really InquistiveSoul, what do you think? M.
I'd rather be a could-be if I cannot be an are; because a could-be is a maybe who - is reaching for a star. I'd rather be a has-been than a might-have-been, by far; for a might have-been has never been, but a has was once an are. - Milton Berle

Sound, balanced teaching is a must. Our default should be to partake. Our default should be to live in joy, not condemnation. Our default should be to love, not to correct, to encourage, not to criticize. (Quote from prisonchaplain)

#4 InquisitiveSoul

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 11:49 AM

I know some mormons who record their prayers in a prayer book that is kept like a diary.


Yeah I was thinking it could make an interesting journal.

#5 InquisitiveSoul

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 11:50 AM

No!

But really InquistiveSoul, what do you think?

M.


No? Really Maureen?

I think it's probably ok, but it may not be the most...I don't know the word I want, maybe humble? There is a certain humility to bowing down to pray.

#6 Dominic_Korozya

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 11:54 AM

Yeah I was thinking it could make an interesting journal.


I think it is an excellent idea, which will help you on your journey through life and faith.

Moroni Chapter 8 verse 16
"I fear not what man can do; for perfect love casteth out all fear"


#7 Gwen

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 11:59 AM

i couldn't see myself writing my prayer in the manner of how i would say my prayers, like letter form. i have in my journal written about things that were weighing on my mind, things i had been praying about, i've written inspiration i'd gotten in regards to those concerns, etc. in that since i guess i've written my prayers. i read an article outlining a scripture study technique. it was suggested to get an inexpensive book of mormon, pick a couple things you really needed guidance about and a couple colors of scripture markers. use a different color for each concern. write them in the front of the book. each time you go to read start by re-reading your questions and praying for guidance and inspiration about those things. then as you read and find insight and inspiration you mark the scriptures and write the thoughts in the margins in the appropriate color. that way you can go back and read it, also keeps you focused on the issues most important to you. i guess in a way doing that might be seen as writing a prayer. in all situations i would be very careful when and where i wrote such things and what i did with the writings later. don't want them getting lost or someone who would not understand reading them. prayers are a very personal thing. pearls before swine comes to mind as well. all that being said i've noticed in the conference issue of the ensign they do not write the prayers given, just the talks.

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#8 Dravin

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 12:21 PM

I've never written a prayer, but I definitely find taking time to think about what I want to pray about results in 'better' prayers as I have that focus and organization. If I don't think about my prayers before hand something vain and repetitious tends to pop out (not good).
Hindsight is all well and good... until you trip.

#9 Just_A_Guy

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 12:24 PM

We're told that our church meetings are generally supposed to be led by the Spirit, and I wonder whether that's partly why (outside of temple dedications) we sort of frown on people who bring pre-packaged prayers to the pulpit. But I should think, in a private context, it would be a very good way of getting one's thoughts organized.

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#10 Finrock

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 12:36 PM

Good afternoon InquisitiveSoul. Greetings from here in Michigan where it's finally starting to warm up! :)

I don't know that there is any doctrine either way on this, but what are your thoughts? Is this simply silly or is it ok? One of the benefits is later on I'd have a record of my prayer to look back on.

Any thoughts?


I present my thoughts only as opinion since I am not aware of any doctrine addressing your specific question. It is an interesting question and a new idea to me that I find intriguing.

I think my only reservation about the idea is that if one were to write down a prescribed prayer that they use repititously. Jesus did warn against using "vain repetitions" when we pray (Matt. 6:7). However, I don't believe this is what you are meaning to do. Essentially our prayers should be prayers of the heart. Meaning, they should come from the part of us that is our core. If one were to write down their thoughts, concerns, questions, thanksgivings, etc. in a journal like entry, I see no reason why using those journal entries as the source of your prayers would be wrong. In fact if you are truly writing the things of your heart then I see no difference whatsoever between that and speaking from your heart at the time of prayer.

While thinking of your question I also thought that doing something like what you describe might even be a superior way of praying. It would seem to me that if I am taking the time to write down the thoughts of my heart I am taking more time also to consider the things I am praying about and for. In a sense I would think that this can help in making one's prayers less repetitous than if they were just saying things on the spot. Sometimes I find myself praying the same type of prayer each morning or evening, which isn't very useful, I don't think.

So, my conclusion is that I like the idea and will give it a try and see if it improves my prayers. Thanks for the idea!

Regards,
Finrock

#11 Dominic_Korozya

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 12:38 PM

We're told that our church meetings are generally supposed to be led by the Spirit, and I wonder whether that's partly why (outside of temple dedications) we sort of frown on people who bring pre-packaged prayers to the pulpit.


In the Catholic Church there are many set prayers, whether a prayer is said prememorised or not there is no difference in the Fathers response. Faith causes the Father to respond.

But I should think, in a private context, it would be a very good way of getting one's thoughts organized.


This is why they were written.

Moroni Chapter 8 verse 16
"I fear not what man can do; for perfect love casteth out all fear"


#12 Maureen

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 02:05 PM

No? Really Maureen?

I think it's probably ok, but it may not be the most...I don't know the word I want, maybe humble? There is a certain humility to bowing down to pray.


I was trying to be facetious InquisitiveSoul. I mean, if you want to do it, then you should do it. I can't imagine thinking that writing prayers, like in a journal, is a bad thing. I'm amazed sometimes with questions that are asked, where the answer is obvious.

M.
I'd rather be a could-be if I cannot be an are; because a could-be is a maybe who - is reaching for a star. I'd rather be a has-been than a might-have-been, by far; for a might have-been has never been, but a has was once an are. - Milton Berle

Sound, balanced teaching is a must. Our default should be to partake. Our default should be to live in joy, not condemnation. Our default should be to love, not to correct, to encourage, not to criticize. (Quote from prisonchaplain)

#13 Just_A_Guy

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 02:10 PM

In the Catholic Church there are many set prayers, whether a prayer is said prememorised or not there is no difference in the Fathers response. Faith causes the Father to respond.


The LDS Church has a couple of set prayers as well--the most prominent being the one that accompanies what we call the Sacrament (our equivalent to your Eucharist).

But LDS meetings will usually open and close with a prayer offered by one of the congregation; and those are almost always extemporaneous.

About half the practice of a decent lawyer consists in telling would-be clients that they are darned fools and should stop.
 

--Senator Elihu Root


#14 Dominic_Korozya

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 02:25 PM

The LDS Church has a couple of set prayers as well--the most prominent being the one that accompanies what we call the Sacrament (our equivalent to your Eucharist).

But LDS meetings will usually open and close with a prayer offered by one of the congregation; and those are almost always extemporaneous.


So you have set prayers aswell.

What about the sign of the cross?

I understand that you also do not use crosses or crucifixes?

Moroni Chapter 8 verse 16
"I fear not what man can do; for perfect love casteth out all fear"


#15 Just_A_Guy

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 02:39 PM

We don't do the sign of the cross, no.

Our meetinghouses don't have crosses; though I think frankly it's more of a cultural thing. Mormonism grew out of 1830s America, and at that point in time the crucifix unfortunately carried a lot of cultural/political baggage for a virulently Protestant nation.

I believe some LDS historians have pointed to a few limited instances of the cross in late-19th-century LDS architecture and clothing. But they're rare.

However, depending on which temple you're looking at and when it was built, you may see other symbols of Christ such as the angel Moroni, the star of David, the all-seeing eye, the so-called Seal of Melchizedek, and (in temples built before the symbol acquired its modern connotations) the pentagram.

About half the practice of a decent lawyer consists in telling would-be clients that they are darned fools and should stop.
 

--Senator Elihu Root


#16 Dominic_Korozya

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 02:46 PM

We don't do the sign of the cross, no.

Our meetinghouses don't have crosses; though I think frankly it's more of a cultural thing. Mormonism grew out of 1830s America, and at that point in time the crucifix unfortunately carried a lot of cultural/political baggage for a virulently Protestant nation.

I believe some LDS historians have pointed to a few limited instances of the cross in late-19th-century LDS architecture and clothing. But they're rare.

However, depending on which temple you're looking at and when it was built, you may see other symbols of Christ such as the angel Moroni, the star of David, the all-seeing eye, the so-called Seal of Melchizedek, and (in temples built before the symbol acquired its modern connotations) the pentagram.


I also believe that your rejection of objects such as crucifixes is mostly down to the reformation. But you guys really like your paintings don't you? :D

Moroni Chapter 8 verse 16
"I fear not what man can do; for perfect love casteth out all fear"


#17 Elgama

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 02:50 PM

I often write my prayers when my brain is wandering and my fibromyalgia is bad - the spirit is strong and I have managed a prayer, also gives me a chance to read back over them

#18 Dominic_Korozya

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 02:57 PM

I often write my prayers when my brain is wandering and my fibromyalgia is bad - the spirit is strong and I have managed a prayer, also gives me a chance to read back over them


As you can imagine I have little statues of Jesus christ and Mary at home, they are my prayer stations! :D Not to mention all of my countless rosaries.

Moroni Chapter 8 verse 16
"I fear not what man can do; for perfect love casteth out all fear"


#19 pam

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 03:03 PM

I also believe that your rejection of objects such as crucifixes is mostly down to the reformation. But you guys really like your paintings don't you? :D


I would not say that our rejection of crucifixes is due to the reformation. We prefer to remember Christ as a living Christ and the cross represents the death of Christ. Nor would I say it's a total rejection.

#20 Connie

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 03:07 PM

Here is a good explanation for why we don't use the cross: LDS.org - Support Materials Chapter - Cross




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