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Sex Therapy?


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#1 lizzy16

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 09:58 PM

Whats the churches views on Sex therapy for married couples? Or about the occupation of a sex therapist?

#2 Dravin

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 10:07 PM

Isn't a sex therapist simply a therapist who focuses on sexual dysfunction in relationships? I take it the question is based on the idea that talking about that part of your relationship with a therapist would be somehow wrong or immoral? Personally I don't see how it'd be different then talking to a regular therapist about sexual issues one may have in a relationship.
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#3 NeuroTypical

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 10:09 PM

The folks at LDS Social Services absolutely cover sex. It's an important part of marriage. But since it's hardly ever the only problem area in a marriage, they don't have dedicated people focusing only on sex.

There's also the book And They Were Not Ashamed: Strengthening Marriage Through Sexual Fulfillment - reviewed and approved by church leadership. Excellent, spiritual, and very detailed book.
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#4 Nathan6329

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 11:28 PM

I think you can kind of use your common sense on that one. If you are having intimacy problems with your spouse it can kind of spoil the marriage so if a therapist will help I don't really think the church can dispute that.

#5 Nathan6329

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Posted 31 January 2011 - 11:29 PM

However, as far as being a sex therapist could be a conflict of interest based on your values. I wouldn't wanna be a therapist encouraging unwed people to improve their sex life or help a person become sexually active who isn't even dating one particular person or married.

#6 pam

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 06:26 AM

Wouldn't be any different than a gynecologist assisting or helping to correct a physical problem that prohibits or causes pain during sexual relations whether they be married or not. It is their job.

#7 Guest_LDS_Guy_1986_*

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 06:35 AM

However, as far as being a sex therapist could be a conflict of interest based on your values.

I wouldn't wanna be a therapist encouraging unwed people to improve their sex life or help a person become sexually active who isn't even dating one particular person or married.


This is the only problem I could think could arise. So it would be wise to apply to a counciling firm that knows and respects your beliefs on premarital sexual relations. It is the same at my current job, my boss knows that I will not work on Sunday for any reason because it is the Sabbath in my faith, and that I need the first Saturday in April and October off for General Conference. He knows of my needs in regards to my faith, he respects my right to observe my faith, and things are very productive.

I have rejected other job offers with higher pay because they refused to reasonably accommodate my religious practices.

#8 hordak

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 06:54 AM

Going to go with Pam on this one. No different the Harry Reid promoting an online poker bill. Payed per view porn at the Marriot hotel LDS Dr filling scripts for birth control to unwed women. Of course I'm not surprised, i have it on good authority she worked at a gas station and sold tobacco. I bet is she was a waitress she would have no problem bringing coffee, tea and even alcohol to the patrons :o;):P You can live your life according to your morals and values while not "forcing" them on others. Millions of people, including church members, do it every day.
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#9 Gwen

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 07:07 AM

no one else is wondering why a teen is asking this question?

i don't have problems, i have issues
problems can be fixed, issues you just deal with



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#10 Guest_LDS_Guy_1986_*

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 07:08 AM

Going to go with Pam on this one.
No different the Harry Reid promoting an online poker bill.
Payed per view porn at the Marriot hotel
LDS Dr filling scripts for birth control to unwed women.

Of course I'm not surprised, i have it on good authority she worked at a gas station and sold tobacco. I bet is she was a waitress she would have no problem bringing coffee, tea and even alcohol to the patrons :o;):P

You can live your life according to your morals and values while not "forcing" them on others.
Millions of people, including church members, do it every day.



Where is the force though, If she councils that the best thing to do is to wait to marriage to start being sexually active?

The Church councils this to every youth man and young women in our Church and plenty choose to ignore the council and not follow it.

Giving advice is not forcing, and if I was a therapist and was told I had to give someone council that I knew was hazardous to there emotional and spiritual health I could not work there.

Advice is just that, I cannot make you listen to my advice or follow it. All I can do is offer my opinion based upon the things I know to be true. No sex till marriage and no sex outside of the marriage are sound advice, and it is up to each individual to decide whether or not to listen to the advice or if they accept the advice.

#11 Guest_LDS_Guy_1986_*

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 07:09 AM

no one else is wondering why a teen is asking this question?


No not at all questions, maybe she is considering a career in therapy and is interested in sex therapy. Whatever the reason is none of my business really.

#12 Guest_mormonmusic_*

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 07:18 AM

There is a branch of sex therapy called surrogate sex therapy. These professionals actually get involved in the actual touching and intimacy part of sex with the couple. Many appear appear to be licensed and it's appears to be a true profession. I'm pretty sure the Church would absolutely discourage that as fornication/adultery etcetera. At a glance, you might think it's a cover for a prostitution enterprise. Morally questionable in my view.

#13 Guest_LDS_Guy_1986_*

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 07:27 AM

There is a branch of sex therapy called surrogate sex therapy. These professionals actually get involved in the actual touching and intimacy part of sex with the couple. Many appear appear to be licensed and it's appears to be a true profession. I'm pretty sure the Church would absolutely discourage that as fornication/adultery etcetera. At a glance, you might think it's a cover for a prostitution enterprise. Morally questionable in my view.





Of course this is a reprehensible things and no God fearing man or women would do such a thing as to be a "surrogate" to show a couple how to be intimate.

I agree this seems more like an attempt to have legal prostitution instead of an legitimate therapy.

This is why it is important to research and know the company you are going to work for if you are in any health services especially mental health!

Important things to know are:

1) Do they allow or support the use of faith based counciling in their practice?

2) Do they allow staff to advocate celibacy till marriage?

3) Do they allow staff to freely offer advice?

4) What is there positions of issues of moral importance?

#14 LDSChristian

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 07:31 AM

no one else is wondering why a teen is asking this question?


That's what I was wondering.

Anyway, my opinion is what goes on in a home like sex stays in the home. I'm 19 & saving for marriage (temple marriage) but I'm pretty sure sex is simple. ;) What's there to need therapy? As for these "therapists" that actually touches and all that, that's just wrong. I don't care how another woman looks, the only woman that will touch me like that will be the woman I marry.

#15 Guest_LDS_Guy_1986_*

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 07:38 AM

What's there to need therapy?



There is legitimate sexual dysfunctions that can require professional help. The big one we hear about all the time is "Sex Addiction" also called hyper-sexual.

This is but one of a dozen of sexual dysfunctions that can harm a marriage and may require professional help. There is nothing wrong about seeking help for a sexual dysfunction (with the exception of that surrogate stuff which is nothing more than legal prostitution) a health relationship requires intimacy and when people have problems being intimate with there spouse a qualified sex therapist can help them overcome these challenges.

#16 Wingnut

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 07:41 AM

...or help a person become sexually active who isn't even dating one particular person or married.


I've never heard of aperson in this situation seeking the services of a sex therapist or of a sex therapist counseling a person like this. Sex therapy is for people in established, committed relationships.

no one else is wondering why a teen is asking this question?


I noticed it at first, but Lizzy's been known to ask a wide variety of questions, with sometimes off-the-wall themes. She is, in many ways (though not in all), wise beyond her years.

...but I'm pretty sure sex is simple. ;) What's there to need therapy?


Then you clearly have no understanding of what sex therapy is. It's not a how-to or practice session. Yes, sex is simple -- in theory. There are myriad emotional, and sometimes physical, issues that come with it that sometimes need help working through, either by a gynecologist or therapist.
Now the trouble about trying to make yourself stupider than you really are is that you very often succeed. -- C.S. Lewis

If we're going to be stupid about this, we're going to be stupid on my terms. -- my husband

#17 hordak

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 08:06 AM

Where is the force though, If she councils that the best thing to do is to wait to marriage to start being sexually active?

The Church councils this to every youth man and young women in our Church and plenty choose to ignore the council and not follow it.

Giving advice is not forcing, and if I was a therapist and was told I had to give someone council that I knew was hazardous to there emotional and spiritual health I could not work there.

Advice is just that, I cannot make you listen to my advice or follow it. All I can do is offer my opinion based upon the things I know to be true. No sex till marriage and no sex outside of the marriage are sound advice, and it is up to each individual to decide whether or not to listen to the advice or if they accept the advice.


There is no "force" hence the quotes. Point is when you train to do a job you do it. Therapist might think, sex is best reserved for married couples, but if the training says no, and the client, and unwed person is paying to improve their sex life it would be wrong to eschew your training (and what the client is paying for) because of your beliefs.

A medical Dr might have more faith in the power of the priesthood blessing, prayer, and scripture study to combat pain, then in narcotics. But Prescribing these thing rather then what the medical research suggest would be wrong.And possibly malpractices.

A sex therapist could say "I think sex should only take place in marriage, however this is how to improve your sex life" would be ok. But to say "I believe sex is best within marriage, so i will not teach you these things, let me spend your time explaining my religious beliefs rather then giving you what you paid for" would be wrong

You can share you beliefs
Store clerk says "you should smoke it's bad for you"
but you can't let your beliefs interfere with your job "I will not sell you smokes" because i believe they are bad.
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#18 LDSChristian

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 08:32 AM

Then you clearly have no understanding of what sex therapy is. It's not a how-to or practice session. Yes, sex is simple -- in theory. There are myriad emotional, and sometimes physical, issues that come with it that sometimes need help working through, either by a gynecologist or therapist.


There's this thing called communication between a husband and wife. Talk with each other and help each other know what to do, not go to some therapist.

#19 Wingnut

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 08:36 AM

There's this thing called communication between a husband and wife. Talk with each other and help each other know what to do, not go to some therapist.


Sometimes more is needed. Do you know that communication issues are a bigger cause of divorce than finances or infidelity?
Now the trouble about trying to make yourself stupider than you really are is that you very often succeed. -- C.S. Lewis

If we're going to be stupid about this, we're going to be stupid on my terms. -- my husband

#20 pam

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 08:40 AM

Of course I'm not surprised, i have it on good authority she worked at a gas station and sold tobacco.


Not only that hordak but I sold..gasp...beer. :)




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