Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Local Evangelical Leader Meets LDS Apostle -- Offers Perspective


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 prisonchaplain

prisonchaplain

    Senior Moderator

  • Senior Moderators
  • 12079 posts
  • LocationFederal Way, WA

Posted 10 January 2012 - 07:18 PM

I read and listened to an interesting report from Rev. Joe Fuiten, of Cedar Park Assembly, in Bothell, WA. He is involved in "values voting," and has worked with LDS people on such issues in the past. So, when LDS Apostle Dalin H. Oaks came to the area, he invited this pastor for a meeting. These are Fuiten's observations:

1. There are still several areas of theological disagreement, though it does little good to focus on what divides in a meeting like this.

2. LDS and the Assemblies of God people share a common culture. We are conservative in our morals, and mostly conservative in our political values.

3. LDS and Pentecostals share a heritage in which our pioneers were persecuted--though LDS more so.

4. Both our churches are experiencing growth.

5. LDS teachings and emphases have changed. There is a stronger focus on Jesus and on grace. We evangelicals should applaud this.

6. LDS doctrine allows for changes, anchored in the authority of the Church, and its living prophets. While we Protestants may not appreciate this approach to doctrine, and we may find such change 'dangerous,' this system may very well allow for a gradual transition towards ever more evangelical thinking.

7. Rev. Fuiten was quick to say that the apostle would not likely agree with this observation. Further, no LDS leader would say they want such change, or are attempting such transitions. Nevertheless, the potential seems to be there, and the reverend personally believes that is the subtle direction the Church is moving towards.

8. The pastor noted some similarities between LDS beliefs about prophecy and spiritual gifts and Pentecostal distinctives.

9. The meeting concluded with Apostle Oaks addressing Rev. Fuiten as "Brother." He was very encouraged, taking that to mean that he was no longer seen as in grave spiritual danger for not being LDS, and also that he was no longer viewed as a hireling of an evil church.

I'm sure many here will find aspects of the above that don't quite sit right. Many evangelicals will too. However, I found the talk quite fascinating. It gives me hope that the future of LDS-Evangelical dialogue can be better than the past has been.

"Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." -- Lord Acton


#2 applepansy

applepansy

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 5700 posts
  • LocationUtah

Posted 11 January 2012 - 08:40 AM

I find his views interesting. Even more interesting that LDS have "changed" their focus. All my life the Church has focused on Christ as our Lord and Savior. He is the center of everything I've been taught all my life.

I think its interesting the perceptions or conclusions people come to depending on which side they are on. We often don't realize that the "wall" between us is more like a thin sheet of cellophane.

Thank you for posting this PC.

#3 norah63

norah63

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 184 posts

Posted 11 January 2012 - 09:18 AM

May there be many more bridges built between us all, so that the Body of Christ will be more effective , by showing the love of the bretheren.

#4 prisonchaplain

prisonchaplain

    Senior Moderator

  • Senior Moderators
  • 12079 posts
  • LocationFederal Way, WA

Posted 11 January 2012 - 09:30 AM

In listening to the talk I had the impression that early LDS writings (19th century?) had less content about Jesus than more recent talks and publications do. Apparently the pastor asked the apostle about this, and, in seeming recognition, Apostle Oaks said that in the early years LDS were focused on survival.

My own perception, just based on this site and the past six years, is that the doctrine of grace (always something LDS accepted) has gained a greater place in members hearts. As one LDS thinker admitted, many members stayed away from "Amazing Grace" because that was a Baptist thing.

I am not privy to all the details, but 1978 was a year of blessed change, with the prophetic approval of Blacks in the priesthood. Also, in 1991 there were apparently some changes in the Temple liturgy that met with much appreciation.

In my own fellowship many would applaud the shift from the King James Version to the New International Version of the Bible. It was not an official change, but rather one that just seemed to happen, over the course of a decade or so. Additionally, the transition from singing only hymns, to blending in worship choruses has added a great sense of spiritual intimacy to our services.

"Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." -- Lord Acton


#5 Maureen

Maureen

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 5729 posts
  • LocationCanada

Posted 11 January 2012 - 09:52 AM

...Additionally, the transition from singing only hymns, to blending in worship choruses has added a great sense of spiritual intimacy to our services.


Very true, one of the best reasons to attend a pentecostal service, IMO. :)

M.
I'd rather be a could-be if I cannot be an are; because a could-be is a maybe who - is reaching for a star. I'd rather be a has-been than a might-have-been, by far; for a might have-been has never been, but a has was once an are. - Milton Berle

Sound, balanced teaching is a must. Our default should be to partake. Our default should be to live in joy, not condemnation. Our default should be to love, not to correct, to encourage, not to criticize. (Quote from prisonchaplain)

#6 prisonchaplain

prisonchaplain

    Senior Moderator

  • Senior Moderators
  • 12079 posts
  • LocationFederal Way, WA

Posted 11 January 2012 - 10:47 AM

Maureen, you can have the best of both worlds (liturgical and pentecostal): Lutheran Renewal - International Lutheran Renewal

"Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." -- Lord Acton


#7 Maureen

Maureen

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 5729 posts
  • LocationCanada

Posted 11 January 2012 - 12:45 PM

Maureen, you can have the best of both worlds (liturgical and pentecostal): Lutheran Renewal - International Lutheran Renewal


Wow, that is very interesting and kind of neat.

M.
I'd rather be a could-be if I cannot be an are; because a could-be is a maybe who - is reaching for a star. I'd rather be a has-been than a might-have-been, by far; for a might have-been has never been, but a has was once an are. - Milton Berle

Sound, balanced teaching is a must. Our default should be to partake. Our default should be to live in joy, not condemnation. Our default should be to love, not to correct, to encourage, not to criticize. (Quote from prisonchaplain)

#8 rayhale

rayhale

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 314 posts

Posted 06 February 2012 - 12:23 AM

6. LDS doctrine allows for changes, anchored in the authority of the Church, and its living prophets. While we Protestants may not appreciate this approach to doctrine, and we may find such change 'dangerous,' this system may very well allow for a gradual transition towards ever more evangelical thinking.

7. Rev. Fuiten was quick to say that the apostle would not likely agree with this observation. Further, no LDS leader would say they want such change, or are attempting such transitions. Nevertheless, the potential seems to be there, and the reverend personally believes that is the subtle direction the Church is moving towards.

8. The pastor noted some similarities between LDS beliefs about prophecy and spiritual gifts and Pentecostal distinctives.

9. The meeting concluded with Apostle Oaks addressing Rev. Fuiten as "Brother." He was very encouraged, taking that to mean that he was no longer seen as in grave spiritual danger for not being LDS, and also that he was no longer viewed as a hireling of an evil church.

I'm sure many here will find aspects of the above that don't quite sit right. Many evangelicals will too. However, I found the talk quite fascinating. It gives me hope that the future of LDS-Evangelical dialogue can be better than the past has been.


I, personally, am grateful that change is allowed, it makes it so that as a Church we are not stuck believing in, for an example, the world is flat, because the Bible may say it is, or that the Sun or the Moon are inhabited because one of our prophets said that he thought that they were.

The Church is changing, one reason is the growing pains it’s getting from being a truly world-wide church, some of the changes is with the ’cultural’ doctrines, like having large families, or having lots of food in case of an emergency. In some places, like China, having more than one child is a crime. As far as food, it’s expensive, and can be both illegal and un-ethical to store plenty of food when people around you are starving. The Church official publications have also changed, they have become more focused on the scriptures, with little, to no quotes, or references, to un-official church books. One major un-official source that has been cut out, and recently has been taken off publication, is Mormon Doctrine, where Rev. Joe Fuiten may have gotten the idea that his church, or any other non-LDS church, was of the devil.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

IPB Skin By Virteq