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What I didn't know about FLDS


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#1 Bini

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 02:10 PM

20/20 recently aired a segment covering a mother's and her children's transition from a Fundamentalist Latter Day Saints compound into the outside world. There was one particular fact that struck me right off balance - FLDS teach their kids in school that their prophet, Warren Jeffs, is also the President of America. This was brought up when the teenaged children expressed embarrassment and disappointment in their FLDS education after enrollment into public school. Anyway, I had a literal jaw drop. Has anyone else heard this before? Is this common knowledge in what the FLDS homeschool their kids?

No more dancing candy cane - hurrah!


#2 Eowyn

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 02:13 PM

Wow. Not surprised, but wow.

"Therefore, let us beware of false prophets and false teachers, both men and women, who are self-appointed declarers of the doctrines of the Church and who seek to spread their false gospel and attract followers by sponsoring symposia, books, and journals whose contents challenge fundamental doctrines of the Church. Beware of those who speak and publish in opposition to God’s true prophets and who actively proselyte others with reckless disregard for the eternal well-being of those whom they seduce. Like Nehor and Korihor in the Book of Mormon, they rely on sophistry to deceive and entice others to their views. They “set themselves up for a light unto the world, that they may get gain and praise of the world; but they seek not the welfare of Zion” (2 Ne. 26:29). (Beware of False Prophets and Teachers, supra.)

Elder M Russell Ballard


#3 Bini

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 02:28 PM

Wow. Not surprised, but wow.


I was really surprised. I had never heard of such thing before.

No more dancing candy cane - hurrah!


#4 Eowyn

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 02:29 PM

That whole group is messed up, but not at the fault of most of the members. The leadership is evil and power and sex hungry, and the higher up you go the more deliberate it is (IMO).

"Therefore, let us beware of false prophets and false teachers, both men and women, who are self-appointed declarers of the doctrines of the Church and who seek to spread their false gospel and attract followers by sponsoring symposia, books, and journals whose contents challenge fundamental doctrines of the Church. Beware of those who speak and publish in opposition to God’s true prophets and who actively proselyte others with reckless disregard for the eternal well-being of those whom they seduce. Like Nehor and Korihor in the Book of Mormon, they rely on sophistry to deceive and entice others to their views. They “set themselves up for a light unto the world, that they may get gain and praise of the world; but they seek not the welfare of Zion” (2 Ne. 26:29). (Beware of False Prophets and Teachers, supra.)

Elder M Russell Ballard


#5 DHK

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 03:05 PM

They're probably in denial that we have an African American president.
"But make no mistake about it, brothers and sisters; in the months and years ahead, events will require of each member that he or she decide whether or not he or she will follow the First Presidency. Members will find it more difficult to halt longer between two opinions (see 1 Kings 18:21). President Marion G. Romney said, many years ago, that he had "never hesitated to follow the counsel of the Authorities of the Church even though it crossed my social, professional, or political life" (CR, April 1941, p. 123). This is a hard doctrine, but it is a particularly vital doctrine in a society which is becoming more wicked. In short, brothers and sisters, not being ashamed of the gospel of Jesus Christ includes not being ashamed of the prophets of Jesus Christ." - Neal A. Maxwell, October 10th, 1978.

http://speeches.byu....viewitem&id=909

#6 pam

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 03:06 PM

Doesn't surprise me one bit.

#7 mordorbund

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 03:12 PM

I had a skewed perception of that segment since I watched it after reading this thread:

http://www.lds.net/f...ut-america.html

#8 Bini

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 03:15 PM

Doesn't surprise me one bit.


Granted, I was not familiar with what FLDS were until the last ten years when I moved to Utah. Prior to that, I had never heard about them, not much anyway. Even now, it's clear that my understanding of just how "off" they are, is waaay underestimated!

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#9 Smudge

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 05:20 PM

I have watched several documentaries about various Christian families/groups in both the UK and USA where they take their children out of school to teach them what they believe to be right the one that really really springs to mind is Westborough Baptist church. I guess sometimes people just have odd ideas about right and wrong - but I know that some people think our ideas of right and wrong are odd too!

#10 jerome1232

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 05:45 PM

I have reservations believing x-anythings about whatever it is they are no longer a part of out of hand. Something about the wild stories I have read and heard of from x-Mormons leads me to believe they aren't all that credible, or it is some twisted ugly form of the truth stretched beyond recognition.

Edited by jerome1232, 05 December 2012 - 05:49 PM.

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#11 Vort

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 05:48 PM

I have watched several documentaries about various Christian families/groups in both the UK and USA where they take their children out of school to teach them what they believe to be right the one that really really springs to mind is Westborough Baptist church. I guess sometimes people just have odd ideas about right and wrong - but I know that some people think our ideas of right and wrong are odd too!


Ya gotta watch out for those freaky homeschooling weirdos and their cultish, brainwashed brats.

On a completely unrelated topic, and apropos of absolutely nothing, my son scored 35 on his ACT!
As if anyone could knowingly commit sin without being changed both in spirit, body, and mind. Let me say this again, sin changes who we are! --james12
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#12 NeuroTypical

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 06:56 PM

I have watched several documentaries about various Christian families/groups in both the UK and USA where they take their children out of school to teach them what they believe to be right

*Raises hand* That would be me too, I guess. We sort of hop around groups though. We did a stint with a secular co-op, gave the Nazarenes a try, and are currently involved with a group based out of a mega-church, and a homeschool academy out of our school system.

Congrats to your kid, Vort! My kids are a ways away from college, but my 8 yr old did just finish Christmas shopping for her kitten, and used her own chores money. We're pretty proud of that.
If I were rich, I'd have the time that I lack, to sit in the synagogue and pray.
And maybe have a seat by the Eastern wall.
And I'd discuss the holy books with the learned men, several hours every day.
That would be the sweetest thing of all.

Ohhh....
If I were a rich man...

#13 classylady

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 07:08 PM

Ya gotta watch out for those freaky homeschooling weirdos and their cultish, brainwashed brats.

On a completely unrelated topic, and apropos of absolutely nothing, my son scored 35 on his ACT!


I didn't home school any of my children. I never felt disciplined enough to do it. I admire those who can. For the most part, I see positive results of home schooling. But, I do have one negative example. My cousin home schooled her 12 children. I don't think any of them (adults now) can really read and write past a 6th grade level. Sad.

#14 Bini

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 07:16 PM

I'd love to homeschool but my husband is not a fan, and it's a decision we both must agree upon. Back to topic :) I'm thinking maybe this isn't an FLDS doctrine but more of something decided by those in the FLDS compound? Or, maybe ALL FLDS teach that Warren Jeffs is the American President??? Crazy..

No more dancing candy cane - hurrah!


#15 annewandering

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 07:34 PM

After Googling the question it seems that many if not most do believe Jeffs is the US president. Of course the media will insist on misstating what President and Prophet and Seer mean so it could be just confusion but it does appear to be what they believe.

#16 Sharky

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 08:40 AM

It really doesn't surprise me. Though I had some contact & interaction with some members of the sect many many years ago before the "seclusion" of members became so strong, & thru that I have some knowledge of many of the teachings they had back then. Since the seclusion compounds are each intended to be totally self-reliant without the outside world, and only select members are permitted to go into the world when necessary, it would be very easy to teach children (and adults) whatever the "Prophet" felt should be taught .... and have it believed 100% whether it be trueth or out-right lie.

#17 applepansy

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 08:43 AM

I'm not surprised.

#18 applepansy

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 08:50 AM

My aunt home schooled her children 30+ years ago and they all qualified to go to BYU. I wish I had home schooled my children. I taught my oldest son at home for 9th grade and turned in a report and examples of his work at home to get him high school credit. That was a lot of work. I am considering home schooling my grandson. We'll see how he does in Kindergarten. I've had to take him out of preschool this year because he doesn't know how to deal with mean behavior in other children. I'm hoping to put him back in class in January. His teacher is wonderful to work with. But I don't know if I'll have the same experience next year. Where I live a lot of families home school. Their children are better educated than their counterparts in public school. Which is a sad situation. Public schools should be doing better.

#19 NeuroTypical

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 09:34 AM

Just to make sure we're all on the same page:

Posted Image

Right?
If I were rich, I'd have the time that I lack, to sit in the synagogue and pray.
And maybe have a seat by the Eastern wall.
And I'd discuss the holy books with the learned men, several hours every day.
That would be the sweetest thing of all.

Ohhh....
If I were a rich man...

#20 Vort

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 09:57 AM

Where I live a lot of families home school. Their children are better educated than their counterparts in public school. Which is a sad situation. Public schools should be doing better.


While I agree that public schools often fail in their duties, I don't agree that they should be exceeding homeschoolers. On the contrary, I think it would be nigh impossible to exceed a well-run homeschooling experience. It is truly the cream of the crop of educational options. There is a reason that homeschooling done by even seemingly unqualified parents tends to produce better students than government-run public schools.
As if anyone could knowingly commit sin without being changed both in spirit, body, and mind. Let me say this again, sin changes who we are! --james12
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Nice hand, friend, but those are not the cards I dealt you.

***********************
Impenetrability! That's what I say!




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