Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

"Seeing the world through God's eyes"

faith god's eyes trials trust world

  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 spirettedotter

spirettedotter

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 37 posts

Posted 13 March 2013 - 02:14 AM

A non-Christian supportive friend/Alanon sponsor told me in person to try to see the world through God's eyes. A few days later, she emailed, "Let me know when God has helped you see the world through his eyes, even if it only lasts for moments, it will be trans-formative."

While I understand the positive spirit in which she meant it, my first thought is that I can't possibly. I'm not knowledgeable, experienced, powerful, wise, or qualified to even come close to His infinite way of viewing & interpreting the world, let alone regarding the complex trials which triggered the conversation. I can do my best to discern how He might see things, based on my limited knowledge of good and evil. But . . .

To ask for such vision, test faith by trying, based on a pretense that I might understand as He does, or imagine I can judge anything on an equal level with God--seems to me to be the opposite of having a humble spirit and a contrite heart.

I believe I need to trust that he sees and knows all, infinitely beyond my capacity. I don't think it's my place to question His reason, knowledge, wisdom and will. Those mysteries are not mine to understand in this life. Instead, I think I must trust that He holds the keys, and the details are none of my business.

I Googled the phrase & found it to be used in the Evangelical revival population.

Can anyone comment with suggestions about how I might best reply on this topic--by sharing gospel principles, without offending or arguing religion? Or am I taking it too literal over-analyzing? :confused:

Hope to get replies soon. Thanks! :P

#2 NeuroTypical

NeuroTypical

    Senior Moderator

  • Senior Moderators
  • 7359 posts

Posted 13 March 2013 - 06:41 AM

Your friend didn't tell you to do it, he told you to try. And yes, you can possibly try.

We all fall short and none of us will get it right all the time. But it was good advice, and you can try.
If I were rich, I'd have the time that I lack, to sit in the synagogue and pray.
And maybe have a seat by the Eastern wall.
And I'd discuss the holy books with the learned men, several hours every day.
That would be the sweetest thing of all.

Ohhh....
If I were a rich man...

#3 Dravin

Dravin

    Gneiss Guy

  • Members
  • 12970 posts
  • LocationIndiana

Posted 13 March 2013 - 07:31 AM

Your friend didn't tell you to do it, he told you to try. And yes, you can possibly try.

We all fall short and none of us will get it right all the time. But it was good advice, and you can try.


And as far as the hubris of it all:

48 Therefore I would that ye should be perfect even as I, or your Father who is in heaven is perfect.


48 Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father which is in heaven is perfect.


Hindsight is all well and good... until you trip.

#4 Finrock

Finrock

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 1021 posts

Posted 13 March 2013 - 08:25 AM

Good Morning spirettedotter! It is a pleasure to meet you. :)

I believe I need to trust that he sees and knows all, infinitely beyond my capacity. I don't think it's my place to question His reason, knowledge, wisdom and will. Those mysteries are not mine to understand in this life. Instead, I think I must trust that He holds the keys, and the details are none of my business.


I don't believe seeing the world through God's eyes means that we don't trust Him. It is more a testament of our faith in God because we are willing to give up our own way of interacting with the world in order to interact with the world as God would.

When I imagine seeing the world through God's eyes, I imagine being able to see the world with eyes of faith and hope and most importantly, with eyes of charity. That means that I don't see strangers, I see brothers and sisters that I love and care for. It means being able to keep an "eternal perspective" which to me means that I am not weighed down by the false notion that this life and its mortal affairs are all that there is. To me, seeing the world through God's eyes means seeing the whole picture.

Regards,
Finrock

#5 Traveler

Traveler

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 8595 posts
  • LocationSandy Utah

Posted 13 March 2013 - 10:42 AM

A non-Christian supportive friend/Alanon sponsor told me in person to try to see the world through God's eyes. A few days later, she emailed, "Let me know when God has helped you see the world through his eyes, even if it only lasts for moments, it will be trans-formative."

While I understand the positive spirit in which she meant it, my first thought is that I can't possibly. I'm not knowledgeable, experienced, powerful, wise, or qualified to even come close to His infinite way of viewing & interpreting the world, let alone regarding the complex trials which triggered the conversation. I can do my best to discern how He might see things, based on my limited knowledge of good and evil. But . . .

To ask for such vision, test faith by trying, based on a pretense that I might understand as He does, or imagine I can judge anything on an equal level with God--seems to me to be the opposite of having a humble spirit and a contrite heart.

I believe I need to trust that he sees and knows all, infinitely beyond my capacity. I don't think it's my place to question His reason, knowledge, wisdom and will. Those mysteries are not mine to understand in this life. Instead, I think I must trust that He holds the keys, and the details are none of my business.

I Googled the phrase & found it to be used in the Evangelical revival population.

Can anyone comment with suggestions about how I might best reply on this topic--by sharing gospel principles, without offending or arguing religion? Or am I taking it too literal over-analyzing? :confused:

Hope to get replies soon. Thanks! :P


There is only "one" way - by keeping the commandments - which means among many things, to covenant with G-d. How well a person sees through G-d's eyes is measurable by how well that person keeps the commandments - if they fall short or fail to keep the commandments they are not seeing through G-d eyes.

I believe the best response to your friend would be to suggest that if they would keep the commandments that the question about seeing through G-d's eyes would become unnecessary and redundant.

The Traveler

#6 spirettedotter

spirettedotter

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 37 posts

Posted 13 March 2013 - 10:46 AM

Thank you much for the responses, Finrock, Dravin, & Loudmouth! I'm glad I got feedback before I responded or dismissed the suggestion.

I'm not sure why my initial response was resistance, but I agree with all your comments completely. I think I was just concerned it didn't fit with LDS gospel & didn't want to get off track. And maybe there's a blemish in my faith at the moment which I need to work on.

I do cherish having the eternal perspective and that's always been what get's me through my trials. I do pray for His Will in all things, and help in knowing what is my footwork to do each day. I try to give up my own will, control, and agenda and trust the Lord fully and humbly.

My biggest difficulty is discerning the guidance and hearing answers so that I also know what's my responsibility to DO, and when to let go and let God (completely without other action on my part). The particular situation involves a small child in my family who I love dearly and is neglected, at risk, and has no voice in the care of an addict.

Since I've been the majority relative caregiver for 20 months until January and am still very closely involved, I'm the only one in a position to document, talk, & take action. I carefully try to discern what and when to act, without getting myself kicked out of the baby's life, which would cause more harm.

My friend's attitude has come across to me as mostly suggesting I do nothing, hand it all over to God, and stay out of it. She encourages more charity toward the addict.

But my feeling is that if everyone minded their own business, nothing bad would likely change. Help and generosity often enables an addict to continue destructive behavior.

I'm trying to find a balance of taking responsibility to help in the whole big picture, showing kindness and empathy to the adult addict without enabling. It's a rotten position to be in, witnessing the suffering of a child at the hands of a addict parent.

I've been using prayer, priesthood blessings, and Alanon to help me get through this hardship, but I'm so glad I thought to post here for some LDS perspective. I hope to get more responses today and appreciate all of you who have and will post back. Thank you all so much. <3 xo

#7 spirettedotter

spirettedotter

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 37 posts

Posted 13 March 2013 - 10:51 AM

Thanks for your comment, too, Traveler. That's an interesting perspective, written concisely, & similar to my initial thoughts.

#8 spirettedotter

spirettedotter

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 37 posts

Posted 13 March 2013 - 05:19 PM

Does this thread seem to be turning into something other than doctrine discussion? Should I move to a different category to get more response, perhaps? Patiently waiting . . .




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

IPB Skin By Virteq