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#1 mcgee

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 06:12 AM

Hey all! Hope your day is great! Thought it would be fun to share some good recipe's! I'm not much of a cook, I do the best I can for my family every night but I'm running low on ideas. Would anyone like to share any tips, recipes, YouTube video or recipe online they tried and loved? :) sick of the same dinners! We all know we love food, c'mon embrace it! Share it! Eat it! Missionaries are excited when I get baptized because apparently members of the church all being food. So spit 'em out! :) hehehe!

#2 Dravin

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 06:45 AM

Hey all! Hope your day is great!
Thought it would be fun to share some good recipe's!
I'm not much of a cook, I do the best I can for my family every night but I'm running low on ideas. Would anyone like to share any tips, recipes, YouTube video or recipe online they tried and loved? :) sick of the same dinners! We all know we love food, c'mon embrace it! Share it! Eat it!


If you don't mind, just how much can you handle in the kitchen? How I explain a recipe to someone who knows there way around hamburger helper and grilled cheese but not much else is different from how I would explain a recipe to how someone who knows more about cooking food. Also, what kind of foods does your family like, or won't eat at all? If you hate lentils with a passion then sharing a lentil soup recipe I use won't do you much good. :)
Hindsight is all well and good... until you trip.

#3 mcgee

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 08:14 AM

If you don't mind, just how much can you handle in the kitchen? How I explain a recipe to someone who knows there way around hamburger helper and grilled cheese but not much else is different from how I would explain a recipe to how someone who knows more about cooking food. Also, what kind of foods does your family like, or won't eat at all? If you hate lentils with a passion then sharing a lentil soup recipe I use won't do you much good. :)


I'd understand :) can always get it offed ad mobbed!

#4 Smudge

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 10:04 AM

I have been finding alot of recipes on pintrest lately

#5 Roseslipper

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 09:55 PM

1 chicken,clean it, in the cave of it put a little salt and sage, outside of chicken put sage and tyme, in a pan put olive oil and some butter, put chicken in and brown it, then u can leave in pan or put in a roaSting pan the chicken add 3 cups of chicken broth,a package of baby carrots, 2 cans of the small potatoes and a onion put on 325 degrees, bake for 1 hr 20 -25 min. this is easy and very tasty. if u want u can have a salad with it. I might be making this myself this weekend.

#6 Roseslipper

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 09:58 PM

If you don't mind, just how much can you handle in the kitchen? How I explain a recipe to someone who knows there way around hamburger helper and grilled cheese but not much else is different from how I would explain a recipe to how someone who knows more about cooking food. Also, what kind of foods does your family like, or won't eat at all? If you hate lentils with a passion then sharing a lentil soup recipe I use won't do you much good. :)


i love homemade lentil soup.....:)

#7 anatess

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Posted 19 April 2013 - 06:50 AM

Here's a very easy one in the same level as hamburger helper that you can get done in 30 minutes flat (if the chicken is already thawed):

Go to the grocery store and buy these:
1.) 1 small package of Basmati Rice
2.) 1-pound boneless chicken breasts or thighs
3.) 2 tablespoons olive oil
4.) 1 Patak's Simmer Sauce (in the International Aisle). It looks like this:
Posted Image
This flavor - Butter Chicken - is my kids' favorite. They can eat a boatload of this.
Notice in the top of the jar label it says Mild. There are other flavors like Tikka Masala flavor that is spicier, just check the Mild-Hot rating on the jar to your taste. Make sure you get the ones that say Simmer Sauce on the jar. There are other Patak products that are in a jar like this that are not Simmer Sauces.
5.) 12-oz package of Brocolli florets
6.) 1 tablespoon minced roasted garlic (they sell these in little jars in the produce section)
7.) 1 tablespoon lemon juice
8.) 1 or 2 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese

Okay, this is how you can make this in 30 minutes:
1.) Cook the Basmati Rice by putting 1 cup Rice to 1.5 cups water in a rice cooker then you can leave it alone until it is done. We Filipinos eat a lot of rice, so my family of 4 can eat 2 cups of Rice for one meal. If you don't have a rice cooker, that's okay, it's not too much trouble to do it on the stovetop. Put the rice and water in a pot with cover and put on the stove on medium-high. When the water boils, take off the lid and let the water boil until you don't see water on top of the rice anymore. Then turn down the stove to medium-low, put the lid back on. You'll know when it's done by taking a small bite of the rice to see if the kernels is soft throughout. Usually, by the time the chicken is done, the rice is done too.

2.) While the rice is cooking, chop up the chicken into 1-inch cubes. Then heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a pan and add the chicken. Set the stove to medium-high. Stir-fry the chicken until cooked through. Add the entire jar of Patak's sauce to the chicken and mix. Set the stove to medium and let simmer for 10 to 15 minutes.

3.) When there's 4 minutes left in the chicken's simmering, put the brocolli in a microwaveable bowl with a lid. Add 1 tablespoon of olive oil and 1 tablespoon of minced roasted garlic. Put the lid on and shake the bowl to mix. Microwave for 2 minutes. Shake the bowl again to mix. Microwave for 1 more minute. Check the brocolli for desired tenderness. Microwave for 1 more minute if desired. Take off lid and add 1 tablespoon of Parmesan cheese and 1 tablespoon of lemon juice. Put on the lid and shake for 5 seconds to mix. If desired, sprinkle 1 extra tablespoon of parmesan cheese as topping.

To serve: Spoon rice onto a dinner plate. Put the chicken on top and spoon chicken sauce over the chicken and rice. Spoon broccoli on the side. It looks good and tastes good and the kids absolutely love it.

And there's your 30-minute meal.

Edited by anatess, 19 April 2013 - 06:57 AM.


#8 anatess

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Posted 19 April 2013 - 07:00 AM

And here's my tip for getting kids to eat veggies. Put something they love on it. My kids love parmesan cheese. They can eat parmesan cheese sticks like it's candy. So, I use parmesan cheese on brocolli and so they'll at least try it. They realize the brocolli tastes okay and the parmesan cheese is still smashing, so they eat the whole lot.

#9 pam

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Posted 19 April 2013 - 07:23 AM

If you don't mind, just how much can you handle in the kitchen? How I explain a recipe to someone who knows there way around hamburger helper and grilled cheese but not much else is different from how I would explain a recipe to how someone who knows more about cooking food. Also, what kind of foods does your family like, or won't eat at all? If you hate lentils with a passion then sharing a lentil soup recipe I use won't do you much good. :)


No, but someone else might like the recipe.

#10 pam

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Posted 19 April 2013 - 07:25 AM

I have been finding alot of recipes on pintrest lately


Pinterest is awesome. I've tried several I've seen there.

#11 2ndRateMind

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Posted 07 November 2014 - 12:08 PM

OK, so here's what I'm cooking tonight, to use up some stuff in the fridge that needed eating. It's cheap, wholesome and all cooks slowly in one half gallon pot, so should be pretty straightforward even for a newbie chef. And there won't be much washing up.

 

2RM's hearty, meaty, winter stew. Serves six. 

 

Loads of chopped onions; say 4 good sized ones.

Half bunch of celery.

Some cooking oil - I use sunflower.

3 Ox hearts, chopped.

12 Sausages. Not sure you guys have british bangers, but any cooking sausage would do. 680g.

Cooking bacon, diced. Again, not sure you guys have it, but any diced (ideally smoked) pork would be fine. 125g.

2 x 400g tins of tomatoes.

1 x 400g tin of beans - butter, flageolet, haricot, whatever. Just not baked!

1 cup pearl barley.

A good shaking of dried oregano.

 

optional extras: worcestershire sauce, tabasco sauce, chilli powder, etc.

 

Method:

Add the oil to the pot. On a medium heat, fry the onion and celery til tanslucent.

Add the meat, and fry some more, stirring every so often. Maybe 5 minutes, til brown.

Add the tomatoes, beans, pearl barley, oregano, turn up the heat some and bring to the boil.

Turn down the heat to low, put a lid on the pot, and simmer gently for an hour, til everything is tender. Keep an eye on it, stir every so often and add boiling water or beef stock to keep everything covered by liquid if you need to.

Season with salt and pepper to taste. Then you're done.

Serve with boiled rice, or boiled potatoes, or just in a bowl with fresh bread.

 

Over here, it all costs about £1.00 per serving, say $1.50 in your money.

 

When I've eaten about half of it, I'll probably stretch it for a few more meals by adding a good sized turnip and a swede, diced small, and cooking again.

 

Hope you try it; hope you like it.

 

Best wishes, 2RM.


Edited by 2ndRateMind, 07 November 2014 - 12:51 PM.

Omnes qui errant non pereunt

Not all who wander are lost


#12 Silhouette

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Posted 07 November 2014 - 03:30 PM

OK, so here's what I'm cooking tonight, to use up some stuff in the fridge that needed eating. It's cheap, wholesome and all cooks slowly in one half gallon pot, so should be pretty straightforward even for a newbie chef. And there won't be much washing up.

2RM's hearty, meaty, winter stew. Serves six.

Loads of chopped onions; say 4 good sized ones.
Half bunch of celery.
Some cooking oil - I use sunflower.
3 Ox hearts, chopped.
12 Sausages. Not sure you guys have british bangers, but any cooking sausage would do. 680g.
Cooking bacon, diced. Again, not sure you guys have it, but any diced (ideally smoked) pork would be fine. 125g.
2 x 400g tins of tomatoes.
1 x 400g tin of beans - butter, flageolet, haricot, whatever. Just not baked!
1 cup pearl barley.
A good shaking of dried oregano.

optional extras: worcestershire sauce, tabasco sauce, chilli powder, etc.

Method:
Add the oil to the pot. On a medium heat, fry the onion and celery til tanslucent.
Add the meat, and fry some more, stirring every so often. Maybe 5 minutes, til brown.
Add the tomatoes, beans, pearl barley, oregano, turn up the heat some and bring to the boil.
Turn down the heat to low, put a lid on the pot, and simmer gently for an hour, til everything is tender. Keep an eye on it, stir every so often and add boiling water or beef stock to keep everything covered by liquid if you need to.
Season with salt and pepper to taste. Then you're done.
Serve with boiled rice, or boiled potatoes, or just in a bowl with fresh bread.

Over here, it all costs about £1.00 per serving, say $1.50 in your money.

When I've eaten about half of it, I'll probably stretch it for a few more meals by adding a good sized turnip and a swede, diced small, and cooking again.

Hope you try it; hope you like it.

Best wishes, 2RM.


This sounds wonderful for a chilly winter's evening. Thanks for the recipe and instructions. I'm going to get the ingredients and try it! 🍲

#13 2ndRateMind

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Posted 08 November 2014 - 03:59 AM

Good luck! I did find, at the end of cooking, it really wanted worcestershire sauce. So I recommend that, if you can get it.

 

Best wishes, 2RM.


Omnes qui errant non pereunt

Not all who wander are lost


#14 Silhouette

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Posted 08 November 2014 - 04:33 AM

Good luck! I did find, at the end of cooking, it really wanted worcestershire sauce. So I recommend that, if you can get it.

Best wishes, 2RM.


Thanks for the tip. I'm going to see if I can get the ingredients today.

#15 pam

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Posted 08 November 2014 - 06:02 AM

Ox hearts?



#16 Dravin

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Posted 08 November 2014 - 08:13 AM

Heart is some tasty meat, it was one of my favorite things about moose hunting (the hunters got to enjoy themselves some heart and tongue). I don't think I've seen heart for sale outside of some fairly large international marts (and I don't trust the meat department at the one nearest me), though I suppose a real butcher could get their hands on some for you.


Hindsight is all well and good... until you trip.

#17 pam

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Posted 08 November 2014 - 05:16 PM

I think I'll pass.



#18 Silhouette

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Posted 08 November 2014 - 06:37 PM

I won't have any ox hearts, but I'll substitute something else.

#19 2ndRateMind

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 10:49 AM

Over here, hearts are counted as 'offal'. They are tasty and nutritious, like liver and kidneys, but more akin to ordinary meat, being muscle. I eat them because they are far cheaper than prime cuts, and because no animal is killed for them, as they would be for, say, prime rib of beef, or shank of lamb. It eases my conscience to eat something that might otherwise be wasted, or go to pet food.

 

Nevertheless, they are not vital to the recipe. Go with the enthusiasm, and substitute whatever you can get, and appeals.

 

Best wishes, 2RM.


Edited by 2ndRateMind, 10 November 2014 - 11:14 AM.

Omnes qui errant non pereunt

Not all who wander are lost


#20 Blackmarch

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 10:04 AM

OK, so here's what I'm cooking tonight, to use up some stuff in the fridge that needed eating. It's cheap, wholesome and all cooks slowly in one half gallon pot, so should be pretty straightforward even for a newbie chef. And there won't be much washing up.

 

2RM's hearty, meaty, winter stew. Serves six. 

 

Loads of chopped onions; say 4 good sized ones.

Half bunch of celery.

Some cooking oil - I use sunflower.

3 Ox hearts, chopped.

12 Sausages. Not sure you guys have british bangers, but any cooking sausage would do. 680g.

Cooking bacon, diced. Again, not sure you guys have it, but any diced (ideally smoked) pork would be fine. 125g.

2 x 400g tins of tomatoes.

1 x 400g tin of beans - butter, flageolet, haricot, whatever. Just not baked!

1 cup pearl barley.

A good shaking of dried oregano.

 

optional extras: worcestershire sauce, tabasco sauce, chilli powder, etc.

 

Method:

Add the oil to the pot. On a medium heat, fry the onion and celery til tanslucent.

Add the meat, and fry some more, stirring every so often. Maybe 5 minutes, til brown.

Add the tomatoes, beans, pearl barley, oregano, turn up the heat some and bring to the boil.

Turn down the heat to low, put a lid on the pot, and simmer gently for an hour, til everything is tender. Keep an eye on it, stir every so often and add boiling water or beef stock to keep everything covered by liquid if you need to.

Season with salt and pepper to taste. Then you're done.

Serve with boiled rice, or boiled potatoes, or just in a bowl with fresh bread.

 

Over here, it all costs about £1.00 per serving, say $1.50 in your money.

 

When I've eaten about half of it, I'll probably stretch it for a few more meals by adding a good sized turnip and a swede, diced small, and cooking again.

 

Hope you try it; hope you like it.

 

Best wishes, 2RM.

that looks good 2RM


A recipe for nonalcoholic wsassail that i use a couple times a year good for holidays.
 

Wassail drink (nonalcoholic version) - a very delicious drink to celebrate the change from fall to winter. ( I make it once or twice a year, one for Halloween and one for thanksgiving, and it's my fave drink) that is made of apple cider, citrus drinks, and various spices. you'll want to have a kettle that can hold a few gallons in it.

the closest commercial drink I've found to it, is Mott's citrus and spice drink mix.. and it doesn't even compare to it at all.

1
put 2 - 2 and 1/2 quarts of water in the kettle then add:
6 cups of sugar
16 all spice
20 whole cloves
4-5 cinnamon sticks
some ginger ( I use ground ginger, a couple good shakes of the can with a perforated top or about 1/8-1/4 teaspoon)

bring it to a solid boil, and let it boil for 5 minutes while stirring occasionally. after the 5 minutes remove the heat and let it sit for an hour.
it gets a nice golden red hue to it by this time for me.

2
after the one hour add;
1 gallon of apple cider (the fresher the better... I suppose you can use apple juice but having pressed cider is wayyyy better)
2 cans of orange juice concentrate, and then use those cans add 6 cans of water
1/2 cup of real lemon juice concentrate (or you can use a can of lemon juice concentrate)

bring to the desired temperature and serve (best served hot, but also is good cold)

for added flavor you can throw in orange and lemon slices and/or cranberries.

Granted this isn't a western native traditional food, but its so flippin good I think I'll add it here if you think its out of bounds for this group then please remove this. Also its a bit on the sugar heavy side so its not very diebetic friendly.

I believe this drink comes from an old eastern tradition that used this drink to bless the trees to live through the winter months as well as various rites to scare away the bad spirits and evil luck. I understand that it usually has some sort of wine added to it but I like how I do it better.


 



Deus Vult

Toji: Indomitable does not mean someone who has never been broken. Indomitable means someone who gets back up, after they have been broken.

Marcus: I'm terrified of a fair univers; to think that everything we suffer is what we truly deserve. I take great solace and comfort in the universe being unfair.

If I lived on 55 Cancri E, i'd be well past my 15000 year old mark.

On kepler 78b I'd be long past my 31,000th year of living.

 





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