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Confessing to a bishop?

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#1 Ulder

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 04:35 AM

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Edited by Ulder, 30 June 2013 - 01:51 AM.


#2 tubaloth

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 09:16 AM

The Bishop is the local leader over a ward (a geographic boundary). The Bishop is one that runs the ward with callings to different members in the ward so the ward can function (help the members grow closer to Christ).
Repentance is between you and your Heavenly Father (and Jesus Christ who preformed the Atonement to make it all happen).
Most (smaller) things that you need to repent off is just between you and Heavenly Father. But sometimes when you break covenants made in the temple, or more serious sins you need extra help to get through them. The Bishop is there to help you over come these sins. If breaking covenants are involved then confessing them to a bishop is necessary to show that we want to repent.
We have a scripture that says:
43 By this ye may know if a man repenteth of his sins—behold, he will confess them and forsake them.

Its kind of like the catholic confession... but I'm only basing that on what I see on TV.

If you feel the something isn't right with confessing to the bishop you can always take it up with the Stake President. The Stake President is Leader over the wards (usually 6-8 wards)

#3 Ulder

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 08:41 AM

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Edited by Ulder, 30 June 2013 - 01:51 AM.


#4 Anddenex

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 09:01 AM

This is a quote that was given by one of our past prophets:

First, those in sin must confess. “By this ye may know if a man repenteth of his sins--behold, he will confess them and forsake them.” (D&C 58:43.) That confession must be made first to the person who has been most wronged by your acts. A sincere confession is not merely admitting guilt after the proof is already in evidence. If you have offended many persons openly, your acknowledgment is to be made openly and before those whom you have offended that you might show your shame and humility and willingness to receive a merited rebuke. If your act is secret and has resulted in injury to no one but yourself, your confession should be in secret, that your Heavenly Father who hears in secret may reward you openly. Acts that may affect your standing in the Church, or your right to privileges or advancement in the Church, are to be promptly confessed to the bishop whom the Lord has appointed as a shepherd over every flock and whom the Lord has commissioned to be a common judge in Israel" (President Harold B. Lee, "Successful Sinners," July Ensign 1971).


These are all parts of the repentance process.

#5 Ulder

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 10:46 AM

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Edited by Ulder, 30 June 2013 - 01:51 AM.


#6 NeuroTypical

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 11:02 AM

From our Gospel Principles manual:

We Must Confess Our Sins
Confessing our sins is very important. The Lord has commanded us to confess our sins. Confession relieves a heavy burden from the sinner. The Lord has promised, “I, the Lord, forgive sins, and am merciful unto those who confess their sins with humble hearts” (D&C 61:2).

We must confess all our sins to the Lord. In addition, we must confess serious sins—such as adultery, fornication, homosexual relations, spouse or child abuse, and the sale or use of illegal drugs—which might affect our standing in the Church, to the proper priesthood authority. If we have sinned against another person, we should confess to the person we have injured. Some less serious sins involve no one but ourselves and the Lord. These may be confessed privately to the Lord.


If I were rich, I'd have the time that I lack, to sit in the synagogue and pray.
And maybe have a seat by the Eastern wall.
And I'd discuss the holy books with the learned men, several hours every day.
That would be the sweetest thing of all.

Ohhh....
If I were a rich man...

#7 Anddenex

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 12:35 PM

Thanks, but couldn't almost anything be considered to affect your standing in the church if you look at it strict?


No, this would be in correct. Even with a strict interpretation of the term "affect your standing in the Church" one need not confess to the bishop for every little sin.

A lie to ones mother as a child doesn't "affect" the standing of a person's membership within the Church. This is a sin that is done in secret, a sin that should be confessed to the person lied to, and then seek forgiveness through prayer from the Lord.

Sins which "affect" our standing in the Church are serious transgressions, i.e. fornication, adultery, addiction to pornography, fraud, stealing, murder, incest, etc..

So small sins by "ordinary" everyday members dont need to be confessed to bishops?


I like the terminology used by our Church in relation to these "small sins". The Church will either use minor transgressions or serious transgressions.

Lying to your mother, although a sin and not good, is a minor transgression. This will not affect ones standing in the Church. Gossiping is a form of sin which doesn't need to be confessed to a bishop.

Oh my goodness, I can only imagine how busy our bishops would be if someone had to confess every little sin. They wouldn't have any time for anything else.

What are the usual things he can decide as repentance?


There isn't really a list of what he can or can not do, and what he decides is dependent upon the seriousness of the transgression.

For some excommunication is the necessary step towards repentance. Others they may not be allowed to have a calling. Others may not be able to say a prayer, give a talk, or partake of the sacrament.

Edit: My last statement needs clarification, when I shared "say a pray" this means say a public prayer in church. People should always pray while they are seeking forgiveness.

Edited by Anddenex, 19 June 2013 - 09:49 PM.


#8 Jane_Doe

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 07:09 PM

A bishop is there to help you on your journey to Christ. When there is a major sin committed (ie, one too large to overcome by ourselves), the bishop is there to guide you through the repentance process, like a consular. He provides insight and reassurance. If a judgment needs to be made (like when someone else was hurt) he will lead that.

A Mormon bishop does NOT actually give the forgiveness for sins—only God may do that. In that area, it does differ from Catholic confession in that regard (correct me if I’m misunderstanding Catholic traditions).

#9 Ulder

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 12:55 AM

,,,

Edited by Ulder, 30 June 2013 - 01:52 AM.


#10 Jane_Doe

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 05:57 AM

Unlike many other Christian denominations, Mormons don’t walk up to the podium for sarement (ie communion). Instead, members pass little trays with the bread and water to one another. There’s usually 6-8 trays going around and it’s a time of personal meditation. I’ve never noticed if someone does or does not take bread/water before passing the tray—I’m focusing on God and his sacrifice.

Taking the sacrament (or not) is a very personal thing, and I feel it would be very shameful to stare at people and gossip “oh they didn’t take the sacrament!” Besides, there are other reasons for not taking the sacrament: many of the non-Mormon guests I’ve brought don’t feel comfortable partaking of rituals outside their own denominations.

#11 NeuroTypical

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 07:06 AM

Is it shameful to not be allowed to take sacrament? Everyone sees it and rumours start?

There is no shame in not taking the sacrament.

If someone sees a person not taking the sacrament, and decides to commit the sin of unrighteous judgement, and engage in sinful gossiping, then that person has a problem which reflects only on them.

In other words, yes, you can find unrighteously judgemental people in our church, and yes, a person who is going through the repentence process may feel like they're being discussed behind their back. But in my experience, the majority of the mormons I've seen, feel compassion and love when they see a brother or sister not taking the sacrament, and they don't think anything further than that.
If I were rich, I'd have the time that I lack, to sit in the synagogue and pray.
And maybe have a seat by the Eastern wall.
And I'd discuss the holy books with the learned men, several hours every day.
That would be the sweetest thing of all.

Ohhh....
If I were a rich man...

#12 estradling75

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 07:15 AM

Unlike many other Christian denominations, Mormons don’t walk up to the podium for sarement (ie communion). Instead, members pass little trays with the bread and water to one another. There’s usually 6-8 trays going around and it’s a time of personal meditation. I’ve never noticed if someone does or does not take bread/water before passing the tray—I’m focusing on God and his sacrifice.


This...

As one of the many that have passed the sacrament (at some point) and carried the responsibility to make sure everyone who wanted it got it... I have noticed those who choose not to (its part of the function of passing) When I thought about it any more then to move on to the next person... I thought there is a person working to get right with God. That is something that needs to be respected.

Are there going to be people that fail to respect that and fall into gossip? Yeap.. But that is them showing their sins and weaknesses.
I had a life once... now I have a computer and a modem.

Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply. Stephen R Covey




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