Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Hard Red Winter Wheat


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 ruthiechan

ruthiechan

    Senior Member

  • Inactive 6+ Months
  • 1198 posts

Posted 23 April 2008 - 01:22 PM

What do you do with it? It's in the starter food storage kit that you can order from lds catalog. . . I know what to do with regular wheat, I use it all the time - more than white flour even, but the hard red stuff? No idea.
"We must be the change we wish to see." -See Who I Am, Within Temptation

www.ruthiechan.net

#2 Jenamarie

Jenamarie

    I am glad for many things.

  • Members
  • 2249 posts

Posted 23 April 2008 - 02:18 PM

You use it the same way, you just won't get as fine a flour when you grind it.

#3 ruthiechan

ruthiechan

    Senior Member

  • Inactive 6+ Months
  • 1198 posts

Posted 23 April 2008 - 02:36 PM

So you have to grind it first? That requires a grinder right? And if that's the case it seems silly for that to be in the home storage starter kit. . . I don't have a grinder. . . How does it taste? Is it good?
"We must be the change we wish to see." -See Who I Am, Within Temptation

www.ruthiechan.net

#4 Jenamarie

Jenamarie

    I am glad for many things.

  • Members
  • 2249 posts

Posted 23 April 2008 - 02:48 PM

I've never tasted it. Yes you'd need a grinder, just like if you bought regular wheat. I think it'd be a good idea to invest in a wheat grinder, especially with wheat shortages appearing in various parts of the world. Whole wheat stores longer, and retains nutrients much much better than already-ground flour.

#5 havejoy

havejoy

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 1204 posts

Posted 23 April 2008 - 03:25 PM

I use hard red wheat all the time. You have to grind it to be used to make bread or pasta. How fine the flour comes out depends upon the setting you use when you grind it. I grind mine so it's the same consistency as the flour I would buy from the store.

#6 Abraham

Abraham

    Senior Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • 169 posts

Posted 23 April 2008 - 03:47 PM

Hard Red Winter Wheat is good ole whole wheat that most people use who want whole wheat. It is good and healthy, but dense and heavy, About 8 - 10 years ago a hybrid whole wheat was inotroduced called 'white wheat'. It is 100% whole wheat but bread, rolls, etc come out alot lighter and fluffier than the red stuff. It is a thousand times better tasing i think and has a lot more versatiltiy. If you can find it then buy the white wheat. It has all the gluten, nutrients, and germ as the red, only better. Be sure to let you WW breads sponge first, if you're not using Dough Enhancer. Abraham

#7 Jenamarie

Jenamarie

    I am glad for many things.

  • Members
  • 2249 posts

Posted 23 April 2008 - 03:48 PM

Okay, what does "sponge" mean??

#8 Guest_Username-Removed_*

Guest_Username-Removed_*
  • Guests

Posted 23 April 2008 - 03:52 PM

If anybody is interested, I have a great bread recipe that I use all the time.

Mark's Honey Whole Wheat Bread

3 Cups of Whole Wheat Flour
1 2/3 Cups of Water
1 1/2 teaspoons of Salt
1/3 Cup of Honey
2 Tbsp of Grandma's (brand) dough enhancer
2 teaspoons of Wheat Gluten
1 teaspoon of Active Dry Yeast
2 Tbsp of Shortening
1 Tbsp of Dry Milk Powder

This is great for larger bread machines. Mix the dry ingredients first, and then add the wet ones last. Use luke-warm water at room temperature. Follow the instructions on your bread machine.

#9 havejoy

havejoy

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 1204 posts

Posted 23 April 2008 - 06:30 PM

I've used both white and red wheats and I can't tell the difference in the bread I make from them. I've started buying only the red wheat because it's less expensive.

#10 Abraham

Abraham

    Senior Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • 169 posts

Posted 24 April 2008 - 08:24 PM

To 'sponge' dough is to let it rise after adding the water (warm), the honey, the yeast, and about 60% of the flour. If you let 'grow' to the top of the bowl, more or less, then the bread is much lighter and not, if you use hard red winter wheat, what we call affectionatly (BTW -after it sponges you add the salt, oil, and the balance of the flour. red - lead - bread. I am a softy for white flour bread, that is to die for, and might probably kill you but I say, "My wife makes 'whole wheat bread - and I make whole white bread'.:D Your friend Abraham

#11 Iggy

Iggy

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 2952 posts
  • LocationOregon Coast

Posted 25 April 2008 - 11:34 PM

Red wheat is for bread and pasta - white wheat is for cookies and cakes. If you don't want to invest in a grain grinder buy your self a coffee/herb/spice grinder and grind 1/4 c of grain at a time. This is what I did for years until I saved up for a Bosch Mixer/ Grinder. As for dough enhancer, you don't have to use it. Add a bit more yeast with your whole grain flour. It is heavier thus you will need more yeast to get it to rise and not be a brick. I use Vital Gluten when I make my multi-grain breads. I prefer them to be a bit heavier. My husband and I really detest the air-bread that you purchase in the stores. My father called it Balloon Bread. They were full of air and nothing else. Made the best glue though! I was raised on homemade bread- it is coarser, and heavier than store bought. Bread is one of the cheapest things to make. If you make 4 to 6 or more loaves, as soon as they are cool, place them in heavy plastic bags, press the air out of them and then freeze. It doesn't take a loaf that long to thaw. I had the Sisters in my ward save their store bought bread bags for me. I washed them and reuse them to put my own bread in.

:angel: :coocoo: :scribe:

“To do well you must do good, and to do good you must first be good."

"We are not human beings having a spiritual experience.
We are spiritual beings having a human experience"


Stephen R. Covey


#12 Abraham

Abraham

    Senior Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • 169 posts

Posted 26 April 2008 - 04:10 PM

I am trying to tell the whole story here. Soft wheat (NOT WHITE WHEAT) is used for cakes because it contains less gluten. Durum wheat is the best for pasta. Hard wheat can be used to anything that takes flour it is just not as ideal as other. It takes some homwork and study to find out what wheat is best for each application. White wheat definitely is NOT just for cakes etc. I have been baking (okay, my wife and me) white wheat bread for years. It is head and shoulders above red wheat bread. It amazing our friend, even in the Church. Abraham.

#13 Jaquelina

Jaquelina

    Junior Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 27 April 2008 - 07:03 AM

I understand that the hard red wheat has a longer shelf life as well.

#14 Abraham

Abraham

    Senior Member

  • Inactive with Posts
  • 169 posts

Posted 29 April 2008 - 02:54 PM

Hi, Okay, red wheat has a shelf life of 50 years and white wheat 48, it is not material. (being a bit facetious) :D Abraham




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

IPB Skin By Virteq